The Offensiveness of a Consistent Apologetic

This is the kind of message apologists need to hear:

It is true that no method of argument for Christianity will be acceptable to the natural man. Moreover, it is true that the more consistently Christian our methodology, the less acceptable it will be to the natural man. We find something similar in the field of theology. It is precisely the Reformed Faith which, among other things, teaches the total depravity of the natural man, which is most loathsome to that natural man. But this does not prove that the Reformed Faith is not true. A patient may like a doctor who tells him that his disease can be cured by means of external applications and dislike the doctor who tells him that he needs a major internal operation. Yet the latter doctor may be right in his diagnosis. …… It is upon the power of the Holy Spirit that the Reformed preacher relies when he tells men that they are lost in sin and in need of a Savior. The Reformed preacher does not tone down his message in order that it may find acceptance with the natural man. He does not say that his message is less certainly true because of its nonacceptance by the natural man.

-Cornelius Van Til, The Defense of the Faith

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Posted on January 22, 2013, in Apologetic Method, Presuppositional apologetics, Van Til Stuff and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. Amen! Van Til is still relevant for today in light of his timeless call to the Christian apologist to not compromise

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